The 10 Highest-Paying Medical Jobs in 2022

stethoscope in doctor's hand suggesting searching for a high paying medical job

Overview

Considering a healthcare career in the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic? Don’t worry – medical jobs still have a lot to offer.

If job security is your priority, healthcare has long been one of America’s most stable industries. Interested in sky-high job satisfaction? You’ll find fulfillment in spades when you don a white coat to help others. Whatever your reasons for pursuing a medical career, you can’t overlook the lucrative payday that comes along with it. 

Want to learn more about potential earnings in this dynamic and rewarding field? Check out our list of the 10 highest-paying medical jobs.

Highest-Paying Medical Jobs: Top 10 List

Several healthcare jobs top the list of highest-paying occupations. But while medical careers are lucrative, you should keep in mind the years of school and training required.

Willing to put in the work for a rewarding payday? Consider pursuing a medical career from the list below.

10. Pediatricians

Pediatricians prevent, diagnose, and treat disease and illness in children. They care for patients from birth through young adulthood. During these critical years, pediatricians promote physical, mental, and developmental well-being.

They work in various settings, from primary care clinics to neonatal ICUs. Love working with children and families? Pediatrics could be the specialty for you.

  • Required Education: 
    • Bachelor’s degree
    • Medical doctor (MD) or doctor of osteopathic medicine (DO) degree
    • 3-year residency program (with up to 4 more years for specialty training)

9. Physicians (Other)

Physicians diagnose, treat, and prevent illness and injury. They perform assessments and offer treatment for patients with a wide range of health issues. They also provide patient education and counseling.

These physicians consist of doctors not included elsewhere on this list. Consider, for instance, allergists, pulmonologists, and oncologists. With so many options, the medical world has a job for every interest.

  • Required Education: 
    • Bachelor’s degree
    • MD or DO degree
    • 3 to 7-year residency program (with specialty training as desired)

8. Family Medicine Physicians

Family medicine physicians provide complete care to patients across the lifespan. They can diagnose and treat most ailments common to the general population.

A family physician doing a good job by making the family smlie

Given their broad expertise, these doctors often work in family practice clinics. There, each family member can receive regular exams and treatment for common and chronic illnesses.

  • Required Education:
    • Bachelor’s degree
    • MD or DO degree
    • 3-year residency program with training in 6 major medical areas (specialty training optional)

7. Internal Medicine Physicians

Internal medicine physicians, or internists, have specialized training in the care of adults. Internists most often work in primary care, but they also work in hospitals and specialty clinics.

These doctors keep a busy schedule. They treat a broad range of ailments, from high cholesterol to asthma and diabetes. Board certification is voluntary, but offers an edge in the job market.

  • Required Education:
    • Bachelor’s degree
    • MD or DO degree
    • 3-year residency in internal medicine (option for 1-3 more years of subspecialty training)

6. Psychiatrists

Psychiatrists diagnose, treat, and prevent mental illness, including substance use disorders. They care for patients of all ages and have a variety of specialty options, ranging from forensics to addiction. Psychiatrists can work in hospitals, schools, private practices, rehab programs, and prisons.

  • Required Education:
    • Bachelor’s degree
    • MD or DO degree
    • 4-year residency program (with option for 1 to 2-year specialty fellowship)

5. Orthodontists

Orthodontists examine, diagnose, and treat misalignment conditions of the teeth and jaw. Best known for applying braces, orthodontists also perform many other procedures for patients of all ages. They can work for a large clinic or open a private practice.

  • Required Education:
    • Bachelor’s degree
    • 4 years of dental school
    • 2 to 3-year residency program

4. Obstetricians and Gynecologists

Obstetricians and Gynecologists, or OB-GYNs, provide medical care during pregnancy and childbirth. They also provide general medical care for women from their reproductive years forward. 

OB-GYNs receive both medical and surgical training. This allows them to perform cesarean sections and other procedures when needed. In this field, strong communication skills and a calm demeanor are must-haves. After all, OB-GYNs interact with patients during the challenges of labor and childbirth.

Male gynecologist checking a pregnant lady with ultrasound in the hospital
  • Required Education: 
    • Bachelor’s degree
    • MD or DO degree
    • 4-year residency program (with optional 3-year fellowship)

3. Surgeons

Surgeons are doctors who assess and treat conditions that may need surgery. Surgery is a huge field with many specialty areas. Consider, for instance, orthopedics, pediatrics, and plastics, to name a few. Moreover, surgeons work in settings ranging from hospitals to outpatient clinics.

Becoming a surgeon requires years of specialized training. And once you complete training, you may work long and irregular hours. But the fact remains: The surgical field offers some of the highest-paying medical jobs in America.

  • Required Education:
    • Bachelor’s degree
    • MD or DO degree
    • 5-year surgical residency program (with option for 1 to 5 more years of specialty training)

2. Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons

Oral and maxillofacial surgeons perform specialized dental surgeries. They treat injuries, diseases, and defects of the mouth and jaw. They also perform dental implant surgeries.

  • Required Education:
    • Bachelor’s degree
    • 4-year dental school degree
    • 4 to 6-year residency program (with optional 1 to 2-year fellowship program)

1. Anesthesiologists

Anesthesiologists are physicians who deliver and maintain anesthesia and manage pain. They monitor patients of all ages and their responses to anesthesia before, during, and after surgery. They care for patients in a variety of specialties, such as pediatrics and obstetrics.

Their work follows the unpredictable schedule of the operating room. After all, they must be present for both planned procedures and emergency surgeries.

  • Required Education:
    • Bachelor’s degree
    • MD or DO degree
    • 4-year residency program (with option of more specialty training)

Finding the Highest-Paying Medical Jobs

If you’re looking for a job that feels good and pays well, healthcare is a hard occupation to beat. Sure, it takes years of training and commitment to build a medical career. But know that your hard work will earn you both respect and financial security!

Feeling inspired? We hope so. Head over to Lensa to find your dream medical job today.

Lensa Insights
Lensa Insights
Work is changing faster than an angry retrovirus. For jobseekers, that means one thing: adapt or die! Lensa Insights is your survival guide, offering actionable career tips to keep your future in focus.

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