Reproductive Health Jobs after Roe: What Does the Roe Overturning Mean for Abortion Clinic Jobs?

Reproductive Health Jobs after Roe

Overview

Reproductive Health Jobs after Roe: What Does the Roe Overturning Mean for Abortion Clinic Jobs?

Let’s talk about reproductive health jobs after Roe. Don’t feel like reading? Listen here!

What happens to reproductive health jobs after the overturning of Roe vs. Wade? 

The U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization effectively strikes down 50 years of precedent on abortion rights. In rendering abortion a state-by-state decision rather than a federal one, the Court has greatly impacted American women’s access to reproductive health care. It has also called into question the livelihoods of healthcare workers across the country who staff abortion clinics and hold related jobs.

The Post-Roe Future: What About Reproductive Health Jobs?

Reproductive health jobs are essential to ensuring the health and well-being of women across America. And empowering women with the resources they need—including access to reproductive healthcare and education—allows them to make decisions that are best for them and their families. 

Unfortunately, reproductive health jobs after Roe are now jeopardized at national clinics and advocacy organizations across the country. And with the loss of these jobs? It’s also likely that women who need access to reproductive care most urgently—such as women of color and those in underserved communities—will disproportionately lose it.

More Questions Than Answers

The legal and regulatory changes resulting from this ruling raise questions regarding abortion clinics and their staff. For example, what will happen to reproductive health jobs after Roe? What does the ruling mean for abortion clinic workers in states with tightening restrictions? And are there also implications for workers in states that protect the right to an abortion?

Looking Forward

In this article, we’ll answer these questions and more as we outline the implications of Roe’s overturning for states across the country. We’ll also take a look at which health-care jobs are most likely to be affected by the Dobbs ruling. Finally, we’ll explore alternative options available to workers whose jobs are moving, changing, or disappearing. 

reproductive health worker

Concerned about your reproductive health job after Dobbs? Keep reading to learn more about the state of things—and where to go from here.

State Abortion Laws after Roe: Where Things Stand Now

Since the overturning of Roe v. Wade, various state laws have already impacted women’s access to reproductive healthcare—and the workers who provide it. So far, many of these laws offer a study in extremes.

15 states now have either banned abortions altogether or banned them after six weeks—before a woman may know she is pregnant. More bans in other states are expected.

21 states, plus D.C., protect a woman’s legal right to seek abortion up to the point of viability or beyond. Many laws have been recently enacted to expand protections or access to more providers who may perform abortions.

State Abortion Laws after Roe: What Are They, and How Will They Impact Reproductive Health Jobs?

Since the overturning of Roe v. Wade, various state laws have already impacted women’s access to reproductive health care—and those who provide it. So far, many of these laws offer a study in extremes. Indeed, some states—such as Texas—rolled back abortion rights almost immediately. Others, like California, Oregon, and Washington, quickly expanded protections for abortion. 

In response, the Guttmacher Institute has grouped states according to the types of abortion restrictions or protections. Below, we’ll look closely at these groups, how their laws may change, and the implications for reproductive health jobs. Let’s dive in!

Note: Unless otherwise cited, the information about abortion laws and policies in this section has been compiled from the Guttmacher Institute and The New York Times.

Group 1: “Most Restrictive” States

The following states currently have the “most restrictive” abortion laws in place: 

  • Abortion is completely banned with very limited exceptions
  • Only physicians can provide abortions, and not other qualified health-care professionals
  • There is a mandatory waiting period of 24-72 hours between counseling or evaluation and the abortion procedure
  • Abortion is completely banned with very limited exceptions
  • Only physicians can provide abortions, and not other qualified health-care professionals
  • There is a mandatory waiting period of 24-72 hours between counseling or evaluation and the abortion procedure
  • Abortion is completely banned with very limited exceptions
  • Only physicians can provide abortions, and not other qualified healthcare professionals
  • There is a mandatory waiting period of 24-72 hours between counseling or evaluation and the abortion procedure
  • Abortion is completely banned with very limited exceptions
  • Only physicians can provide abortions, and not other qualified health-care professionals
  • There is a mandatory waiting period of 24-72 hours between counseling or evaluation and the abortion procedure
  • Abortion is completely banned with very limited exceptions
  • Only physicians can provide abortions, and not other qualified healthcare professionals
  • There is a mandatory waiting period of 24-72 hours between counseling or evaluation and the abortion procedure
  • Abortion is completely banned with very limited exceptions
  • Only physicians can provide abortions, and not other qualified healthcare professionals
  • There is a mandatory waiting period of 24-72 hours between counseling or evaluation and the abortion procedure
  • Abortion is completely banned with very limited exceptions
  • Only physicians can provide abortions, and not other qualified healthcare professionals
  • There is a mandatory waiting period of 24-72 hours between counseling or evaluation and the abortion procedure
  • Abortion is completely banned with very limited exceptions
  • Only physicians can provide abortions, and not other qualified healthcare professionals
  • There is a mandatory waiting period of 24-72 hours between counseling or evaluation and the abortion procedure
  • The state constitution explicitly excludes abortion rights
  • Abortion is completely banned with very limited exceptions
  • Only physicians can provide abortions, and not other qualified healthcare professionals
  • There is a mandatory waiting period of 24-72 hours between counseling or evaluation and the abortion procedure
  • The state constitution explicitly excludes abortion rights 

What This Means for Reproductive Health Jobs

Many of these states already lacked accessible options for women seeking abortion prior to Roe’s overturning. And now, the situation for reproductive health jobs is even more dire.

Indeed, abortion clinics that remained open in these states up until the Dobbs decision have now been forced to shutter, relocate, or continue operation only on the basis of other health services offered. For example, the Jackson Women’s Health Organization – Mississippi’s lone abortion provider and the source of the Dobbs lawsuit – relocated to Las Cruces, New Mexico, soon after the ruling. 

Due to these changes, reproductive health-care workers in these states will need to urgently reassess their situation and consider alternative options. More details on this in the next section.

Group 2: “Very Restrictive” States

The following states currently have “very restrictive” laws in place regarding abortion:

  • Abortion is banned at 6 weeks or later
  • Only physicians can provide abortions, and not other qualified healthcare professionals
  • There is a mandatory waiting period of 24-48 hours between counseling or evaluation and the abortion procedure
  • Abortion is banned at 6 weeks or later
  • Only physicians can provide abortions, and not other qualified healthcare professionals
  • There is a mandatory waiting period of 24-48 hours between counseling or evaluation and the abortion procedure
  • Abortion is banned at 6 weeks or later
  • Only physicians can provide abortions, and not other qualified healthcare professionals
  • There is a mandatory waiting period of 24-48 hours between counseling or evaluation and the abortion procedure
  • Abortion is banned at 6 weeks or later
  • Only physicians can provide abortions, and not other qualified healthcare professionals
  • There is a mandatory waiting period of 24-48 hours between counseling or evaluation and the abortion procedure
  • The state constitution explicitly excludes abortion rights. A “trigger” ban on abortion is set to take effect on August 25, 2022. This will ban all abortion without exception for rape, incest, or child sexual abuse.

What This Means for Reproductive Health Jobs

Reproductive health jobs will likely be significantly impacted in these “very restrictive” states. 

In fact, according to reports, the four states in this group already have fewer clinics providing abortion services than before the Dobbs decision. And the probable reason for this? With the access window for abortion services shortened to 6 weeks – before many women even know they’re pregnant – fewer women can now get abortions. Unfortunately, this indicates that more clinics will likely be forced to close in the future.

The takeaway? Reproductive health jobs are less at risk here than in the most restrictive states, but workers should still seek alternatives and consider having a backup plan in place.

Group 3: “Restrictive” States

The following states currently have “restrictive” abortion laws in place (*Additionally, some of these states have “trigger” bans or pre-Roe abortion bans in place. In some cases, these laws have been temporarily blocked by courts. In other cases, these laws will go into effect in the coming weeks or months.):

  • Abortion is banned as early as 15 weeks in some states, and as late as fetal viability (generally 24-26 weeks of pregnancy) in others
  • Only physicians can provide abortions, and not other qualified healthcare professionals
  • There is a mandatory waiting period of 18-72 hours between counseling or evaluation and the abortion procedure
  • Abortion is banned as early as 15 weeks in some states, and as late as fetal viability (generally 24-26 weeks of pregnancy) in others
  • Only physicians can provide abortions, and not other qualified healthcare professionals
  • There is a mandatory waiting period of 18-72 hours between counseling or evaluation and the abortion procedure
  • Abortion is banned as early as 15 weeks in some states, and as late as fetal viability (generally 24-26 weeks of pregnancy) in others
  • Only physicians can provide abortions, and not other qualified healthcare professionals
  • There is a mandatory waiting period of 18-72 hours between counseling or evaluation and the abortion procedure
  • A new law banning abortion completely, with very limited exceptions, is scheduled to take effect on September 15, 2022*
  • Abortion is banned as early as 15 weeks in some states, and as late as fetal viability (generally 24-26 weeks of pregnancy) in others
  • Only physicians can provide abortions, and not other qualified healthcare professionals
  • There is a mandatory waiting period of 18-72 hours between counseling or evaluation and the abortion procedure
  • Abortion is banned as early as 15 weeks in some states, and as late as fetal viability (generally 24-26 weeks of pregnancy) in others
  • Only physicians can provide abortions, and not other qualified healthcare professionals
  • There is a mandatory waiting period of 18-72 hours between counseling or evaluation and the abortion procedure
  • Abortion is banned as early as 15 weeks in some states, and as late as fetal viability (generally 24-26 weeks of pregnancy) in others
  • Only physicians can provide abortions, and not other qualified healthcare professionals
  • There is a mandatory waiting period of 18-72 hours between counseling or evaluation and the abortion procedure
  • Abortion is banned as early as 15 weeks in some states, and as late as fetal viability (generally 24-26 weeks of pregnancy) in others
  • Only physicians can provide abortions, and not other qualified healthcare professionals
  • There is a mandatory waiting period of 18-72 hours between counseling or evaluation and the abortion procedure
  • A “trigger” law is set to take effect on August 25, 2022. This law will ban abortion completely, with very limited exceptions*
  • Abortion is banned as early as 15 weeks in some states, and as late as fetal viability (generally 24-26 weeks of pregnancy) in others
  • Only physicians can provide abortions, and not other qualified healthcare professionals
  • There is a mandatory waiting period of 18-72 hours between counseling or evaluation and the abortion procedure
  • A “trigger” law has been temporarily blocked by the courts. If it were to take effect, this law would ban abortion completely, with limited exceptions*
  • Abortion is banned as early as 15 weeks in some states, and as late as fetal viability (generally 24-26 weeks of pregnancy) in others
  • Only physicians can provide abortions, and not other qualified healthcare professionals
  • There is a mandatory waiting period of 18-72 hours between counseling or evaluation and the abortion procedure
  • A new law banning abortions at 15 weeks or later is scheduled to go into effect on September 24, 2022*
  • Abortion is banned as early as 15 weeks in some states, and as late as fetal viability (generally 24-26 weeks of pregnancy) in others
  • Only physicians can provide abortions, and not other qualified healthcare professionals
  • There is a mandatory waiting period of 18-72 hours between counseling or evaluation and the abortion procedure
  • A “trigger” law has been temporarily blocked by the courts. If it were to take effect, this law would ban abortion completely with very limited exceptions*
  • Abortion is banned as early as 15 weeks in some states, and as late as fetal viability (generally 24-26 weeks of pregnancy) in others
  • Only physicians can provide abortions, and not other qualified healthcare professionals
  • There is a mandatory waiting period of 18-72 hours between counseling or evaluation and the abortion procedure
  • A pre-Roe law remains in place that would ban abortion completely – and criminalize performing the procedure. The state’s governor and attorney general have filed a lawsuit attempting to block the ban*
  • Abortion is banned as early as 15 weeks in some states, and as late as fetal viability (generally 24-26 weeks of pregnancy) in others
  • Only physicians can provide abortions, and not other qualified healthcare professionals
  • There is a mandatory waiting period of 18-72 hours between counseling or evaluation and the abortion procedure
  • The state constitution explicitly excludes abortion rights
  • A new law that would ban abortion completely has been temporarily blocked by the courts*

What Are the Implications for Reproductive Health Jobs in These States?

The impact of Roe’s overturning on reproductive health jobs in these “restrictive” states is hard to predict. Because laws in many of these states have yet to be enforced – or are currently being challenged in courts – the status of abortion rights could change at any time.

But with restrictions likely to continue tightening, odds are that more abortion clinics will be forced to close. This means the number of reproductive health jobs available in these states will also decline. As a result, abortion clinic staff – and other women’s health workers – should have a plan B. 

Group 4: “Somewhat Restrictive / Somewhat Protective” States

The following states currently have a combination of “somewhat restrictive” and “somewhat protective” abortion laws in place:

  • Abortion is banned as early as 23 weeks
  • Qualified health professionals – not solely physicians – can provide abortions
  • There is no mandatory waiting period between counseling or evaluation and the abortion procedure
  • Abortion is banned as early as 23 weeks and as late as the start of the third trimester
  • Qualified health professionals – not solely physicians – can provide abortions
  • There is no mandatory waiting period between counseling or evaluation and the abortion procedure
  • Abortion is banned as early as 23 weeks and as late as the start of the third trimester
  • Qualified health professionals – not solely physicians – can provide abortions
  • There is no mandatory waiting period between counseling or evaluation and the abortion procedure
  • Provides legal protections for patients and abortion clinic staff
  • Abortion is banned as early as 23 weeks and as late as the start of the third trimester
  • Qualified health professionals – not solely physicians – can provide abortions
  • There is no mandatory waiting period between counseling or evaluation and the abortion procedure
  • Provides legal protections for patients and abortion clinic staff
  • Abortion is banned as late as the start of the third trimester
  • Qualified health professionals – not solely physicians – can provide abortions
  • There is no mandatory waiting period between counseling or evaluation and the abortion procedure
  • Abortion is banned as early as 23 weeks and as late as the start of the third trimester
  • Qualified health professionals – not solely physicians – can provide abortions
  • 72 hours waiting period between counseling or evaluation and the abortion procedure
  • Abortion is banned as early as 23 weeks and as late as the start of the third trimester
  • Qualified health professionals – not solely physicians – can provide abortions
  • 24 hours waiting period between counseling or evaluation and the abortion procedure
  • Provides legal protections for patients and abortion clinic staff
  • Abortion is banned as early as 23 weeks and as late as the start of the third trimester
  • Qualified health professionals – not solely physicians – can provide abortions
  • There is no mandatory waiting period between counseling or evaluation and the abortion procedure
  • Provides legal protections for patients and abortion clinic staff
  • Abortion is banned as early as 23 weeks and as late as the start of the third trimester
  • Qualified health professionals – not solely physicians – can provide abortions
  • There is no mandatory waiting period between counseling or evaluation and the abortion procedure
  • Provides legal protections for patients and abortion clinic staff
  • Abortion is banned as early as 23 weeks and as late as the start of the third trimester
  • Qualified health professionals – not solely physicians – can provide abortions
  • There is no mandatory waiting period between counseling or evaluation and the abortion procedure
  • Abortion is banned as early as 23 weeks and as late as the start of the third trimester
  • Qualified health professionals – not solely physicians – can provide abortions
  • There is no mandatory waiting period between counseling or evaluation and the abortion procedure
  • Provides legal protections for patients and abortion clinic staff
  • Abortion is banned as early as 23 weeks and as late as the start of the third trimester
  • Qualified health professionals – not solely physicians – can provide abortions
  • There is no mandatory waiting period between counseling or evaluation and the abortion procedure
  • Abortion is banned as early as 23 weeks and as late as the start of the third trimester
  • Qualified health professionals – not solely physicians – can provide abortions
  • There is no mandatory waiting period between counseling or evaluation and the abortion procedure

What This Means for Reproductive Health Jobs

The impact of the Roe overturning on reproductive health jobs in  “somewhat restrictive / somewhat protective” states is a mixed bag. In states that have extended legal protections for abortion and its providers – such as Minnesota – abortion clinic staff face no immediate threat. Demand for their services may even increase as restrictions in surrounding states tighten. 

In states that do not offer explicit protection, however, there is no guarantee that abortion will remain safe long-term. Indeed, its continued protection in states like Virginia and Michigan hinges on the governor and other elected officials with the power to enforce or veto bans.

Overall, the job outlook for reproductive health workers in these states remains largely unchanged for now. But these workers should consider potential alternative jobs – while planning ahead is still an option.

Group 5: “Protective” States

The following states currently have “protective” abortion laws in place:

  • Abortion is either banned at fetal viability (generally 24-26 weeks of pregnancy) or not restricted at all based on gestational age
  • There is no mandatory waiting period between counseling or evaluation and the abortion procedure
  • Abortion is either banned at fetal viability (generally 24-26 weeks of pregnancy) or not restricted at all based on gestational age
  • Qualified healthcare professionals – not solely physicians – can provide abortions
  • There is no mandatory waiting period between counseling or evaluation and the abortion procedure
  • Abortion is either banned at fetal viability (generally 24-26 weeks of pregnancy) or not restricted at all based on gestational age
  • Qualified healthcare professionals – not solely physicians – can provide abortions
  • There is no mandatory waiting period between counseling or evaluation and the abortion procedure
  • Abortion is either banned at fetal viability (generally 24-26 weeks of pregnancy) or not restricted at all based on gestational age
  • Qualified healthcare professionals – not solely physicians – can provide abortions
  • There is no mandatory waiting period between counseling or evaluation and the abortion procedure
  • Abortion is either banned at fetal viability (generally 24-26 weeks of pregnancy) or not restricted at all based on gestational age
  • Qualified healthcare professionals – not solely physicians – can provide abortions
  • There is no mandatory waiting period between counseling or evaluation and the abortion procedure
  • Abortion is either banned at fetal viability (generally 24-26 weeks of pregnancy) or not restricted at all based on gestational age
  • Qualified healthcare professionals – not solely physicians – can provide abortions
  • There is no mandatory waiting period between counseling or evaluation and the abortion procedure
  • Abortion is either banned at fetal viability (generally 24-26 weeks of pregnancy) or not restricted at all based on gestational age
  • Qualified healthcare professionals – not solely physicians – can provide abortions
  • There is no mandatory waiting period between counseling or evaluation and the abortion procedure
  • Abortion is either banned at fetal viability (generally 24-26 weeks of pregnancy) or not restricted at all based on gestational age
  • Qualified healthcare professionals – not solely physicians – can provide abortions
  • There is no mandatory waiting period between counseling or evaluation and the abortion procedure
  • Abortion is either banned at fetal viability (generally 24-26 weeks of pregnancy) or not restricted at all based on gestational age
  • Qualified healthcare professionals – not solely physicians – can provide abortions
  • There is no mandatory waiting period between counseling or evaluation and the abortion procedure
  • Abortion is either banned at fetal viability (generally 24-26 weeks of pregnancy) or not restricted at all based on gestational age
  • Qualified healthcare professionals – not solely physicians – can provide abortions
  • There is no mandatory waiting period between counseling or evaluation and the abortion procedure
  • Abortion is either banned at fetal viability (generally 24-26 weeks of pregnancy) or not restricted at all based on gestational age
  • Qualified healthcare professionals – not solely physicians – can provide abortions
  • There is no mandatory waiting period between counseling or evaluation and the abortion procedure
  • Abortion is either banned at fetal viability (generally 24-26 weeks of pregnancy) or not restricted at all based on gestational age
  • Qualified healthcare professionals – not solely physicians – can provide abortions
  • There is no mandatory waiting period between counseling or evaluation and the abortion procedure

Additionally, many of the states above provide legal protections for patients and abortion clinic staff. Some states also mandate funding for abortion in the form of Medicaid funds, required private health insurance coverage, and – in the case of California – additional state funding.

What This Means for Reproductive Health Jobs?

The implications for reproductive health jobs in “protective” states are minimal compared to those in more restrictive states. However, Roe’s overturning will certainly make an impact in these states – it will just be felt differently.

Because here’s the thing: some abortion clinics in restrictive states have chosen to relocate to more “friendly” states (like the ones in this group) since the ruling. And with more and more states tightening restrictions, patients seeking abortions will have to travel to states where the procedure is protected. 

This means that we’ll likely see an increased need for abortion clinic staff and other women’s health workers in these “protective” states. After all, they’ll be struggling to meet the growing demand from patients.

Group 6: “Most Protective” States

The state of Oregon currently has the “most protective” abortion laws in place:

  • Abortion is not restricted based on gestational age
  • Qualified health-care professionals – not solely physicians – can provide abortions
  • There is no mandatory waiting period between counseling or evaluation and the abortion procedure
  • Legal protections are provided for patients and abortion clinic staff
  • Private health insurance plans are required to cover abortion.
  • State Medicaid funds also cover abortion, and additional state funding helps patients pay for abortion care

What This Means for Reproductive Health Jobs after Roe

Because Oregon laws provide “maximum” protection for abortion, there is no current threat to the state’s abortion clinics and associated jobs. In fact, as in other protective states, the need for reproductive health workers in Oregon is expected to increase in the wake of the Dobbs ruling. Why? 

As mentioned above, many abortion clinics in hostile states plan to relocate to haven states (like Oregon) in order to continue providing care. Along the same line of reasoning, Oregon is also likely to see an increased demand for abortion services from out-of-state patients following the Dobbs decision. Indeed, Oregon clinics started gearing up for this possibility in the weeks before the ruling. At that time, abortion advocates projected a 235% increase in people traveling from out of state for abortion services in the case of Roe’s overturning. 

Reproductive Health Jobs: The Post-Roe Future

The overturning of Roe has put many abortion clinics and other reproductive health jobs at risk.

In the process, the Dobbs ruling has also impacted career decisions for many highly skilled members of the workforce. According to data from Fall 2021, roughly two-thirds of college-educated workers have said they “would not move to a state with extreme abortion restrictions.”

So, the ripple effects of Roe’s overturning are vast. But reproductive health jobs—especially at abortion clinics—are clearly at risk

Which Reproductive Health Jobs Are Most at Risk—and What Are the Alternatives?

As a former Labor and Delivery nurse, I know that people don’t usually end up in reproductive health jobs by accident. Instead, they feel uniquely called to this field. And for many of them, it is impossible to imagine doing anything else.

Does this sound like you? If so, take a deep breath—and know that there are alternative career paths. Health care is a dynamic and ever-changing field. And with a little research, you can find another job that aligns with your values, fulfills your passion for reproductive health, and allows you to serve people with limited resources. Keep reading to learn more!

Physicians

Physicians who provide abortions in restrictive states are in a precarious position. They’re working to perform a needed service, but they face potential legal action for continuing to do their job. With more and more abortion clinics closing in the wake of Dobbs, physicians in this field should examine alternatives and plan their next move.

Alternative Options

One option for physicians who provide abortions? Relocate—at least part-time—to a state where abortion is protected, and continue to do the work.

Some physicians have already discussed traveling across state lines to provide abortions several days per week or month. This would allow them to maintain a practice in their home state as well.

Another option? Offering reproductive care via telemedicine and prescribing abortion pills to patients in states that allow them.

reproductive health jobs after Roe v wade

If these options aren’t realistic or appealing, don’t worry. There are other medical jobs that offer the opportunity to provide reproductive care. For example, consider working as an OB/GYN on a labor and delivery unit or in a local women’s clinic. You could also pivot into family medicine.

Nurse Practitioners (NPs), Midwives, and Physician Assistants (PAs)

Advanced practice providers—such as those listed above—can currently provide abortions only in states which explicitly allow them to do so. And states allowing providers other than physicians to perform abortions? They tend to have other protective laws around abortion, too. Translation? NPs, PAs, and midwives should be able to continue providing care in their current roles. 

Alternative Options

If laws should change, advanced practice providers have a wealth of alternative career paths at their fingertips. For example, midwives could consider staffing hospital labor and delivery units, providing care at outpatient women’s clinics, or staffing birth centers. Physician Assistants can think about a pivot into gynecology-oncology. And nurse practitioners might consider working in family care an appealing option.

Registered Nurses (RNs)

Nurses who staff abortion clinics in restrictive states face potential clinic closings and job losses. Fortunately, nurses specializing in reproductive care are in high demand—and it is expected that this trend will continue for years to come. Check out alternative job options for nurses in reproductive health-related fields below.

Alternative Options

There are many choices available for nurses who want to provide care in the field of women’s and reproductive health. For instance, nurses with experience working in abortion clinics may want to consider a hospital position in a labor and delivery or postpartum unit.

reproductive health rights

These nurses could also find fulfilling work caring for new mothers as lactation consultants. Another appealing option? Working as a sexual or reproductive health educator in their community.

Clinical Technicians (CTs) and Medical Assistants (MAs)

CTs and MAs are often overlooked when talking about reproductive health jobs. However, they play an essential role in patient care in hospitals and abortion clinics across the country. And like nurses, CTs and MAs who staff abortion clinics in restrictive states face clinic closures and job loss. Below, we share alternative career ideas for reproductive health workers in these roles.

Alternative Options

Medical assistants who want to remain in the field of reproductive health can consider working in a labor and delivery or postpartum unit. A job in gynecology or an outpatient clinic may also be appealing. 

Clinical technicians who staff abortion clinics may want to consider training as surgical techs to assist with Cesarean sections and other procedures in a labor and delivery unit. They could also consider working in postpartum units or outpatient women’s health clinics. The options are endless!

Reproductive Jobs After Roe: Moving Forward

Health-care providers in the field of reproductive care experience a unique privilege every time they walk into work. Indeed, those who choose these professions support patients on some of their best days—and help them through some of their worst. And this has never been more apparent than in the months following Roe’s overturning.

Reproductive health jobs in abortion clinics and elsewhere face elimination in states with tightening restrictions and near-complete bans. Make no mistake: the future of these laws and their impact is still unclear. But if you work in this field—especially in a state where abortion is restricted or threatened—you would be wise to think about the future.

We Can Help

At Lensa, we’re here to help with personalized job listings and insightful advice. Consider the possibilities and check out available openings in your field today!

Madeline Kelso
Madeline Kelso
Madeline Kelso is a freelance writer and registered nurse based in Baltimore, MD. With more than ten years of nursing experience in pediatric oncology, radiation oncology, and perinatal care, Madeline uses her expertise as a springboard to dive into healthcare’s hot topics. In her spare time, she enjoys planning epic camping adventures, experimenting with vegan baking, and wrangling her two young children.

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